Switched On: Extra Sensory Perception

Each week Ross Rubin contributes Switched On, a column about consumer technology.

At Intel’s CES 2012 press conference, the giant chipmaker justified calling thin notebook PCs “ultrabooks” by noting how the devices would increasingly be characterized by more than their thinness.

The integration of sensors has become so core to the modern smartphone experience that their absence would make using such devices untenable.

Most of that differentiation was based on plans to integrate the kinds of sensors that have become commonplace in smartphones and tablets, sensors that can detect location, motion, orientation and proximity. The integration of sensors has become so core to the modern smartphone experience that their absence would make using such devices untenable. Imagine if we had to manually reorient a display every time we wanted to play a game or take a photo or if we had to avoid activating a button with our cheeks when holding a phone against them.

But as Switched On discussed in taking on how screen size affects form factors, what is a limitation of form factor today may not hold true tomorrow. Already, of course, smartphones can tap into remote intelligence for applications such as remote camera viewing or unlocking of doors via services from home security companies such as ADT and Vivint. From around the world, you can even remotely start a vehicle using the Viper SmartStart app. But there are increasing opportunities for smartphones to act on information from sensors that are not embedded into their shells.

Continue reading Switched On: Extra Sensory Perception

Switched On: Extra Sensory Perception originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 18 Mar 2012 17:30:00 EST.

By | 2012-03-18T23:00:22+00:00 March 18th, 2012|Android Related|0 Comments

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