Respawn Entertainment has partnered with Nexon and Particle City in an effort to bring Titanfall games to Android and iOS platforms in 2016, promising a “deep rich mobile experience”. Read more…

Google has published a new app called Who’s Down for iOS and Android, which lets users declare their availability for plans and allow them to carry out group conversations with interested friends. Read more…

It’s hard to believe this day has finally arrived: once a far-flung pipe dream, then a realistic rumor, and now an undeniable unboxing, BlackBerry has finally made an Android phone. The Priv, originally referred to as the Venice, is set to ship on November 6th for customers in the USA. On the other side of the pond however, UK retalier Carphone Warehouse has received a release unit and unboxed it for all to behold: The segment begins with a quick look at the box, with the lovely lady featured in the video pointing out the packaging contains the words “Privilege” and “Privacy”. While offering an idea of how BlackBerry ultimately chose to name the phone, it is her British pronunciation of the latter word that may give some North American viewers an “a-ha” kind of revelation. Inside the box are standard tools-of-the-trade, including the device itself, a SIM ejector tool, manuals, headphones, and a USB cable. The video also demonstrates several unique BlackBerry features. Carried over from BB10, BlackBerry Hub is retained and can be accessed by holding down the Home button and swiping to the right. Hub is a one-stop go-to for all notifications. The Priv’s virtural keyboard allows you to “flick” word predictions into the text field by swiping up from a key, The physical keyboard borrows from the Passport, meaning that not only is it a traditional typing device, but also allows includes trackpad functionality for navigation. BlackBerry Calendar is demonstrated, as well as BlackBerry Search, the latter of which allows you to search both the phone and the internet and can be activated by swiping up and left from the Home button. The video ends with a quick look at DTEK by BlackBerry, a unique app that places proper priority on privacy and allows users to […]

Google is dipping their toes into teen social media with a new app called Who’s Down. The app serves as a way to broadcast one’s availability and interest so as to bring together equally free and similarly inclined people. The app is currently invite-only, and the sign-up form for Who’s Down asks only for your email address and school, meaning the app is specifically targeting a younger demographic. Google seems tentative to re-enter the social media scene after their previous experience with Google+. Although the Facebook alternative has attracted a number of hardcore fans who were more than ready to leave their Likes behind in favor of +1’s, the social media platform has failed to garner the same level of mass-market appeal enjoyed by its rival and has arguably become more of a niche platform (though one many of us love). Of course, Who’s Down likely isn’t seen by Google as a replacement for Google+, just a way target a different audience.  Who’s Down looks to be a new angle on the increasingly valuable instant messaging environment, an area of interest where Google has been consistently trailing behind services like Facebook Messenger, iMessage, and WhatsApp. Although Google Hangouts is a very effective messaging platform, it hasn’t really ever snared the massive younger messaging audience that it’s low-key name seems to target. Who’s Down is currently available in the Google Play Store. You need an invitation to use it, but if you don’t have one, you can request one from the app upon signing up. Get it on Google Play!

Dead Effect 2 is a game that aims to “push the boundaries of mobile gaming to another level,” promising console-levels of quality in terms of action, story, and RPG elements. The game placed second at the Very Big Indie Pitch contest in 2015, and it is now available for download in the Google Play Store. Zombie combat games aren’t exactly novel in the Play Store. UNKILLED is one of the more prominent recent additions to an already sprawling library of shambling undead awaiting touchscreen massacre. Nevertheless, this Dead-Space-esque sequel might be worth checking out. The game puts its weight on storytelling, which isn’t something you can often say about mobile zombie games. You find yourself where the previous game left off, adrift on an abomination-infested spaceshift adrift in the abyss, and of course you’re going to need to fight your way through. A wide variety of weapons makes sure you’ll never get bored, and the graphics are simply stunning. It even supports enhanced graphics if you’re playing on a device with NVIDIA’s SHIELD. Dead Effect 2 is clearly part of an ongoing trend to establish Android as a serious gaming platform. The game sports professional voice actors and is tricked out with a soundtrack that begs for headphones. Furthermore, the character development system allows you to grow and evolve as a character across an arc with the option to play as three distinct personalities. In true RPG style, weapons, armor, and implants are swappable and upgradeable in a way reminiscent of Mass Effect, and the campaign claims to be more than twenty hours long. Thirty hours, if you’re a completionist who can leave no sidequest unturned. Since it’s free to play with in-app purchases, you might as well give it a spin. Check out Dead Effect 2 in the Google […]

Apple has just released their second app for the Google Play Store, and this one allows users to manage their Beats Pill+ speaker. This app follows up their less-than-diplomatic premiere Move to iOS, a release that saw some pretty hilarious responses. This Beats Pill+ app is far more functional and less passive aggressive than Move to iOS, and it sports features that allow users to synchronize multiple speakers to achieve greater depth of sound and stereo effects, as well as the ability to let more than one user control music playing from a single speaker. This companion app promises to give you and your friends greater control over your music. It was developed exclusively for the Beats Pill+ speaker, and it uses Bluetooth pairing to manage and control the device from your phone or tablet. The Beats Pill+ is a small speaker designed by Apple that aims to provide rich, powerful sound in a tiny, sleek package. Advertised as sounding “bigger than its size,” the Beats Pill+ uses a “stereo active 2-way crossover system” that creates an “optimized sound field for dynamic range and clarity across all genres of music.” The device can also function as a speakerphone when connected with a mobile device and has a 12-hour battery life. Although it’s not the long-awaited Apple Music, Beats Pill+ actually provides Android users who are not interested in swapping operating systems some utility. You can find it in the Google Play Store.

According to a new report, Google is planning to follow in Microsoft’s footsteps and merge Chrome OS with its mobile offering, Android. The unified operating system is slated for a launch in 2017. Read more…

The Moto X Force is the ‘world’s first shatterproof’ smartphone. It is the international variant of the Verizon-exclusive Droid Turbo 2, and it comes with top-of-the-line specifications. Read more…

Sprint is offering a new plan they’re calling an “unlimited data plan” for only $20 a month. Unlimited data plans have long been the holy grail of power users, some of which found themselves buying phones outright to keep their grandfathered plan rather than sign a new contract. However, Sprint isn’t using this word the way it’s universally understood. Sprint’s shady little plan offers a paltry 1GB of LTE data, after which subscribers are shoved down onto 2G networks. That’s right: the mobile equivalent of the 28k modem. A technology so antiquated that it’s expected to be shut down completely sometime in the next two years to make room on the electromagnetic spectrum for services that are actually useable. The desperate mobile carrier isn’t the first to offer low-cost, low-service plans like this – T-Mobile, for instance, has an almost identical one they call “Simple Choice” -but they are the first carrier to try to spin this bug into a feature by using blatantly misleading language. As mentioned previously, the data portion of the plan is only $20 a month, but you’re going to fork over another $20 for unlimited calls and texting. That brings this godawful plan to $40. If you want to stay on LTE rather than bump down to 2G, Sprint’s offering 1GB chunks at $15 a pop. This means if you’re the kind of user who actually needs real unlimited data, by the time you hit 3GB, you might as well have just sprung for Sprint’s actual unlimited plan which runs for $70 a month. The grungiest thing about all this is how deliberately misinforming it is. If Sprint sets a precedent and is able to start calling an extremely limited plan “unlimited” by just kicking you over to dial-up once you pass a threshold, mobile companies […]

Back in 1994, I had a Starfox wristwatch that made me, inarguably, the coolest kid in first grade. Sure, the little buttons were hard to press. And yes, the tiny screen made it impossible to tell what was going on. And perhaps it’s true that Mrs. Graham sent me home with a note that said “John struggles to pay attention as it is, so giving him gadgets to bring to school only exacerbates the problem.” Nevertheless, I was a hit on the playground. (Or at least I got hit on the playground. Being a geek wasn’t as easy in the 90’s.) Technology sure has come a long way. Today, Youtuber Hacking Jules released a video showcasing his ability to run Super Mario 64 and the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time on an LG G Watch. Sure, the buttons look hard to press. And yes, the tiny screen makes it impossible to tell what’s going on. And maybe it’s true that Mrs. Graham would be no more thrilled to see this in her classroom than she was to bear witness to my mighty Starfox watch. But still, you’ve gotta admit it’s pretty damn cool. The N64 emulator actually looks pretty workable. The framerate seems to chug pretty frequently, but I’ve seen people have a worse time in Minecraft and just deal with it. A physical controller seems like it would free up a lot of the screen and increase playability too. What are your thoughts? Technological breakthrough worthy of Mrs. Graham’s appreciation or total waste of time and computing power?

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