As IFA starts to slowly edge its way over the horizon, the product teasers start to rain. We’ve already seen hints from Sony, an outright admission from Samsung, and speculation from HTC. The latest tidbit, comes via ASUS’s Facebook, which suggests it plans to show a new tablet at the event. What can we say about it? Well, odds on it’s another Transformer Pad, running Android, and if you’re into numerology (and consistency), Tegra 4 inside. Coincidentally, an unknown ASUS tablet (pictured after the break) with model number K00C popped up at the FCC last week, revealing little more than the usual WiFi and Bluetooth radios, and a display somewhere around 10-inches. Though the description of it as a Transformer Pad could indicate that whatever its exact configuration, it’s arrival in the US won’t be that far out. Filed under: Tablets, ASUS Source: Facebook

Unlike babies that wail when they’re born, the three new members of Alcatel’s One Touch family have silently slipped into the company’s website. The two handsets, the Idol S and the Idol Mini, follow the original trio revealed at CES this year, sharing similar elements despite the difference in size. Both run Android 4.2, can read microSD cards up to 32GB in capacity and support quad-band GSM, as well as some UMTS (3G) bands, depending on the model. Idol S, the larger of the two weighs 110 grams, has a 4.7-inch 1,280 x 720-pixel screen and DC-HSPA data connectivity. It’s powered by a 1.2GHz dual-core processor, has 4GB of internal storage, 1GB of RAM and an 8-megapixel rear / 1.3-megapixel front-facing camera. On the other hand, the Idol Mini has a smaller 4.3-inch 854 x 480-pixel display, weighs 96 grams and comes with HSPA+. It’s equipped with up to 8GB of internal storage, 512MB of RAM and a 5-megapixel rear / VGA front camera. Filed under: Cellphones, Tablets, Mobile Via: GSM Arena Source: Idol Mini, Idol S, One Touch Evo HD

The Nexus 7 (2013) tablet experienced some annoying bugs after its launch, including GPS issues and touchscreen problems, both acknowledged by Google and supposed to have been fixed by a recent software update. However, it looks like the touchscreen issues are still there for some new Nexus 7 buyers, even after the JSS15Q update is applied (see video below). Android Police speculates that some of these Nexus 7 units that still present touchscreen glitches may have been calibrated incorrectly – but such a problem could be solved via a second software update. However, even if a second software update is released, it may not completely fix the issue in case Asus used various touchscreen digitizer types when manufacturing the tablet. Another explanation offered for the problems is a grounding issue, which can’t be fixed with a simple software update: The origin of this theory comes from a specific symptom where the tablet doesn’t experience any problem while being held or connected to a charger, but erratic behavior and ghost touches start occurring while resting on a flat surface. Again, these are only educated guesses and have not been validated by Google or any third party. Paul Wilcox from Google’s Product Support forum has confirmed that the company is still looking into these remaining touchscreen issues, so we’ll probably learn more details about it in the future. Meanwhile, in case your new Nexus 7 still behaves erratically, you can always have it replaced. Have you had any Nexus 7 issues? Did the touchscreen issues persist after the JSS15Q update?

Google isn’t stopping with Glass. Last year they acquired WIMM Labs, that later dropped off the face of the earth to work secretly in the depths of Mountain View. More wearables in the works? Read more…

The new Nexus 7 is now available in the UK as well as parts of Europe starting at £199.99 for the 16 GB Wifi version, but the 4G version offered on O2 won’t be available for two more weeks. Read more…

The launch of BlackBerry Messenger on Android and iPhone has been on the cards for months. Yesterday, the company erroneously announced the launch on its website – could its arrival be imminent? Read more…

Shazam’s Android app has needed a makeover for a while; even with tablet support, the sound identification tool has felt more at home in 2011 than 2013. The company is delivering that overdue redesign today with the launch of Shazam 4.0. The new app gives Android users a modern, Holo-inspired interface that scales to all Android devices, including a wider variety of tablets. It also brings the iOS version’s faster sound scans and more dynamic listening screen. While there aren’t many other changes, there’s more than enough here to justify grabbing the update through Google Play. Filed under: Cellphones, Tablets, HD, Mobile Source: Google Play

The thinner our devices become, the less room there is for speakers and other thicker components. Kyocera has a solution, however: it just modified its Smart Sonic Receiver conduction technology for use with conventional, over-the-air audio. The company’s new Smart Sonic Sound device still relies on a piezoelectric actuator, but vibrates against a film to generate as much volume as a regular speaker in a far thinner (under 1.5mm thick) design. The new speaker might even sound better than its traditional counterparts. It delivers full volume and quality in a 180-degree listening arc, and it’s responsive enough to recreate very subtle noises. Smart Sonic Sound is already shipping in LG’s 55-inch curved OLED TV, and Kyocera expects it to reach laptops, tablets and other devices where interior space is valuable. Update: Our colleagues at Engadget Japanese have posted their first-hand look at Kyocera’s speaker technology, complete with a gallery of live photos; we’ve posted two of them here. Filed under: Home Entertainment, Laptops, Tablets, HD, Mobile, LG Source: Kyocera

A study of online mobile app stores claims that 69 percent of the apps in the Windows Phone Store are “dead”, meaning they have less than 10 reviews and no updates since they launched. Read more…

Following the original ASUS PadFone Infinity (A80) with Snapdragon 600 SoC, rumors of a new “PadFone Infinity A86” (or “PadFone T004”) go as far back as July 20th, with benchmark evidence showing a more powerful Snapdragon 800 enabling this mysterious device. While details are still light, several eagle-eyed PadFone fans have started noticing a new name on ASUS’ tech support page: “The new PadFone Infinity.” Assuming this is more of an official name and less of a placeholder, it looks like we’ll be seeing an identical-looking device sporting Qualcomm’s latest piece of silicon; and perhaps a launch is imminent — maybe at IFA next week? But ASUS, it really wouldn’t hurt if you guys can throw in a microSD slot plus a dedicated keyboard dock as well this time. Remember the original PadFone? Good times. Filed under: Cellphones, Tablets, Mobile, ASUS Via: Mobile01 Source: ASUS, GFXBench

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