A new rumor claims that Samsung will announce the Galaxy S III smartphone, the third major version of its Galaxy S series, sometime in February 2012 with an impressive list of features. Read more…

Amazon has announced that it has now sold “millions” of its Kindle Fire tablet along with “millions” more of its Kindle eReaders and that it was the best holiday ever for the Kindle hardware family. Read more…

The past 12 months have been a boon of technological innovation, particularly in the world of mobile devices, where top companies have been waging an arms race for the top of the smartphone and tablet hills. Not everything has been smooth sailing, however — 2011 has also been dotted by delays, false starts, security breeches and straight up technological turf outs. Check out some of the lowlights from the year that was after the break. Continue reading Tech’s biggest misfires of 2011 Tech’s biggest misfires of 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 29 Dec 2011 13:00:00 EST.

Android chief Andy Rubin has announced that over a two day period, Google activated nearly 3.7 million new Android devices, nearly 3 times the daily average. Read more…

The developers from the CyanogenMod project have shared a pre-release version of their launcher for Android devices running Ice Cream Sandwich. Read more…

While we already rode the white unicorns of HP’s now disintegrated webOS series, there was one little filly we didn’t get to saddle up. A developmental model of the seven-inch TouchPad Go has now made it into the hands of webOSnation and has been given a thorough going over. The major differences from its bigger brother? A rear-facing 5 megapixel camera and a smudge buffering matte finish on the back are the main signifiers. Aside from those (and an experimental build of the next firmware update), it’s a tiny TouchPad. The Go matches the resolution of the original, also packing the same processor innards of the defunct white TouchPad. Those unwilling to accept the future of webOS can still absorb the full critique of what could have been in a video review after the break. Continue reading HP TouchPad Go gets reviewed, but remains already long gone (video) HP TouchPad Go gets reviewed, but remains already long gone (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 28 Dec 2011 12:29:00 EST.

A number of Android-based smartphones made by LG will get upgraded to the new Android 4.0 operating system in 2012, although it will take months for some of the phones to get the update. Read more…

As 2011 draws to a close, it’s fun to look back and think about how we began the year testing the first Honeycomb tablet, and are now ending it elbow-deep in me-too slates, many of them cut down to smaller sizes. So it should surprise no one, then, that Toshiba released the Thrive 7″, a mini (and aptly named) version of the original Thrive, which went on sale last summer. But in Toshiba’s case, shrinking a tablet and calling it a day is a dicey proposition. After all, the 10-inch Thrive had some baggage — namely, middling battery life, a chunky, toy-like design and a bug that initially kept it from waking after recharging. Indeed, the Thrive 7″ looks near-identical, and even packs the same Tegra 2 chip, 16GB of storage and vanilla take on Honeycomb. Still, it brings an LED flash, keeps its big brother’s 1280 x 800 display and costs less than the original did when it first came out. So are these improvements enough to make this smaller Thrive stand out? And how does it stack up against all those other 7-inch slates we’ve been testing lately? Let’s find out. Gallery: Toshiba Thrive 7″ review Continue reading Toshiba Thrive 7″ review Toshiba Thrive 7″ review originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 27 Dec 2011 12:00:00 EST.

Remember CUPP Computing‘s PunkThis board we played with at Computex 2011? It’s now left the confines of its 2.5-inch hard drive form-factor and jumped ship from a standard Asus netbook to a Core i5-equipped Eee Slate EP121, taking residence alongside the tablet’s battery. As a refresher, PunkThis puts a complete ARM-based system into an x86 computer by replacing the SATA HDD with a single core 1GHz Texas Instruments OMAP 3730 processor, 512MB RAM and WiFi, along with a mini-PCIe socket for SSD storage, plus connectors for the host’s video, audio and USB interfaces. While CUPP computing is still working hard to make PunkThis commercially available for tech-savvy individuals, it acquired Israeli security company Yoggie last July and built this demo machine to attract another kind of customer. The tablet we tested was running Windows 7 Home Premium and Android 2.3.4 simultaneously, and was equipped with an additional button for switching between x86 and ARM modes. Since the Asus EP121 already uses a mini-PCIe SSD instead of 2.5-inch SATA storage, a prototype PunkThis board was designed to fit alongside a modified battery. Gingerbread didn’t break a sweat supporting both the 1280×800-pixel capacitive touchscreen and pen-based Wacom digitizer thanks to some additional hardware and software tweaks. Beyond the ability to switch between Windows for heavy lifting and Android for improved battery life, it’s possible to use both x86 and ARM side-by-side. Imagine antivirus and firewall software running on the PunkThis board in mission-critical security applications for enterprise, and it’s easy to see where CUPP Computing is going with this. Check out the gallery below and our hands-on video after the break. Gallery: CUPP PunkThis tablet hands-on Continue reading CUPP’s PunkThis graduates to tablets, earns a degree in security (hands-on video) CUPP’s PunkThis graduates to tablets, earns a degree in security (hands-on video) […]

OnLive has announced that its streaming game service can now be played on the Android smartphone the Sony Xperia Play, using its slide out game pad to control the games. Read more…

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